The One Thing That Limits God’s Actions

Used with permission from http://bit.ly/1vuhPKE
Used with permission from http://bit.ly/1vuhPKE

Jesus’ power and authority in this world are bound only by His divine choice.

  Nothing on this earth binds the will of God!

If He wants to calm a storm, He calms a storm.

If He wants to cast out a demon, He says one word, “Go!” and they’re gone.

If He wants to heal a sickness, He heals a sickness.

But if He does not want to calm a storm—if He does not want to give faith where there is unbelief—if He does not want to convert people’s hearts, then He is not bound to do so.

The only thing that limits the action of God is the desire of God.

I hope by now that you’re seeing why this seems like a problem to us.  I hope you feel the tension.  Because that tension exists in our lives.

The struggles we have, whether physical, spiritual, relational, or otherwise—the struggles we have in every arena of life—these struggles are not bigger than God.  He could solve them with a word right now.

But instead, He has made an intentional choice to allow those struggles to continue.  He is Lord of every arena of your life—His will is ultimate and He can change anything He wants.

And that raises the question:

If He has the power and authority to do so, then why doesn’t He bring peace, freedom, and restoration to every arena of my life?  And more than that, why doesn’t He bring peace, freedom, and restoration to the whole world right now?

How have you come to terms with this difficult question?  Share your thoughts below!

This is an excerpt from last Sunday’s sermon at Faith Presbyterian Church in Covington, LA.  For more, listen here or subscribe to our podcast here.

If Jesus can fix my problem, then why doesn’t He?

Jesus, being God, has the authority and the power to do anything He wants.

We will see that in our sermon text this Sunday, just like we saw it in our text last Sunday:

Where there is sickness, He can heal.  Where there is a storm of chaos, He can bring the calm of peace.  Where there is demonic oppression, He can bring freedom.  He has the power to accomplish all these things!

But that’s not the only thing we will learn about Jesus this Sunday.  We also learn this difficult truth: while Jesus has authority and power to heal and to restore, He doesn’t always choose to wield that power.

What we have here is a theological, philosophical, and imminently practical problem.  If Jesus has authority and power to bring peace, freedom, and healing, then why doesn’t He do it everywhere and in every circumstance?  We see this problem in the Bible and we see it in our lives.  If Jesus can fix my problem, then why doesn’t He?

How have you dealt with this challenging question?  Share your thoughts below!

And join us at 10:30am this Sunday at Faith Presbyterian Church as we tackle this challenging topic.

Is Jesus Willing to Change You?

A man with leprosy came and knelt before [Jesus] and said, “Lord, if you are willing, you can make me clean.” (Matthew 8:2)

This man comes to Jesus with faith.  He comes to Jesus in obedience.  Yet he comes lacking hope.

If you’re willing, you can make me clean.  That’s not hope talking.  That’s hopelessness talking!

That’s saying, “I’ve been stuck in this cycle of unhealth and brokenness.  And I don’t know if Jesus wants to save me from it.”  That’s not hope.

Hope is coming to Jesus expecting not only that He is able to change your life, but that He is also willing to do it.  Hear this:

Jesus is willing to help you grow in obedience.

Jesus is willing to help you grow closer to God.

Jesus is willing to make you into the man or woman that He wants you to be.

Jesus is willing to reconstruct your life and your relationships and to put you on a better path.

He is willing!  Hope believes that.

This is an excerpt from last Sunday’s sermon at Faith Presbyterian Church in Covington, LA.  For more, listen here or subscribe to our podcast here.

Hoping for Others What You Hope For Yourself

The work of the Church is not to build herself up, but to make much of Christ and His Gospel.

Do you expect big things from God?

Do you expect Him to convert hearts that hate and revile Him?

Do you expect Him to change the people that you least love?

Do you expect Him to change the world—to bring justice where there is injustice, to bring peace where there is unrest, to bring healing where there is sickness?

Because that’s what the Gospel promises.  If you’ve seen it in your life, do you expect it to continue?  And do you expect it in the lives of others?

Remember God’s end game.  He’s not trying to get a few of us to heaven.  He’s taking over the whole world one person and one family at a time.

So let’s start hoping like it.

This is an excerpt from last Sunday’s sermon at Faith Presbyterian Church in Covington, LA.  For more, listen here or subscribe to our podcast here.